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Sigma Series

The Sigma Series

The Sigma Series Lectures, presented by NASA Langley Research Center and hosted at the Virginia Air & Space Science Center in downtown Hampton, provide an opportunity to the general public to learn more about science and technology subjects. Lectures are the first Tuesday of every month and, unless otherwise indicated, the starting time for all lectures is 7:30 pm.

Sigma Series lectures are open to the general public at no charge.

For more information on Sigma Series please visit their website at: colloqsigma.larc.nasa.gov

In-person events are currently on hold due to COVID-19, however, virtual lectures have taken place since December 2020. Please check back here for updates or subscribe to email reminders. Thank you for your support and patience during this time.

To receive monthly email reminders about upcoming Sigma Lectures, send a blank email to: sigma-series-subscribe@lists.nasa.gov

 

Upcoming Events: 

Dr. Stephen Wolfram imageMarch 2, 2021: In many ways it’s the ultimate question in science: how does our universe work? Is there a fundamental theory? Stephen Wolfram will discuss his bold effort to use what he’s learned from exploring computational systems to build a fundamental theory of all of physics during his talk: Have we found the machine code for the universe? 

Click here for event flyer.

Lecture will begin at 7:30pm. Live-stream the event here: www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-lrc 

April 6, 2021: Honey bee colonies in the US have been dying at high rates for the last 14 years. There is growing consensus that the causes of these losses are multifactorial, including varroa mites, pesticides, loss of habitat, and poor nutrition. Dr. vanEngelsdorp will discuss an epidemiological approach to examining the drivers of honey bee colony death during his talk: Why are Honey Bees Dying?

Lecture will begin at 7:30pm. Live-stream the event here: www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-lrc 

Co-sponsored by: NASA Langley Research Center and

Sponsor logos for VASSC and City of Hampton